Log of Magnificent Trees: Banyan Tree

The Banyan tree ignites the imagination and has for centuries.

It is easy to see why. It has multiple sinewy, strong, tail-like “trunks” that are actually aerial roots that drape to the ground, overlap and grow together in a mass.

It was commonly called the Dragon’s Tree because people thought the tree’s trunk resembled hanging dragon tails.

As you look at this tree you can easily imagine it as an awesome treehouse, a pirate’s hiding place, a wizard’s home or as the inspiration for a frightening tree that comes alive with a great branches entangling prey like a giant python.

For such a majestic monster, this tree begins life as an epiphyte, a plant that lives off another plant. The seeds lodge in a crevice of the host tree and take hold sending long roots down to the ground. In time, the roots engulf the host tree which dies, leaving a hollow columnar center that is the banyan tree’s core.

The aerial and surface roots mature into thick, woody trunks that spread and can resemble a cluster of trees, but are actually one.  The largest Banyan trees are in India, where it is native, and where it is regarded as sacred and the source of many medicines.

The name comes from a word meaning merchants as it was under the canopy of Banyan trees that Hindu merchants sold their wares.

Here in zone 10, the Banyan is a wonderful shade tree that is a delight to behold.

New Lake Worth School Garden Prepares for the Season

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My husband teases that if there’s a community garden anywhere in the country, I’ll find it.

I can’t deny that it certainly seems that way but I think Community Gardens find me!

Yesterday morning, we brought our bikes to the Lake Worth, Florida and rode in a beachside historic district known for its very sweet and petite cottages. The entire neighborhood is one charming little house after another, some with pretty gardens, picket fences or sculptural banyan trees.

While we were exploring, I spotted a community garden buzzing with activity.  It’s planting time in zone 10 and the gardeners and helpers were busy in this revitalized garden located across the street from a school.

Lori Vincent, Managing Director of Aurora’s Voice, which provides opportunities for underserved youth, is lending support to the project which they hope will provide job training, business experience and give students hands-on gardening time to grow nourishing food.

Vincent, who has gotten other community gardens off the ground, said there is a real need in this community where 85% of public school students live below the poverty line.

Of course I shared information with them about the online resources for starting and organizing community gardens at the American Community Gardening Association website.

The new school garden is looking for volunteers and supporters. Jason Clements, head gardener, has many good ideas and if anyone in the area wants to lend their support, this would be a great place to be hands on.

You can get in touch with the garden organizers by emailing: Lori@aurorasvoice.org

Log: Magnificent Trees – Rainbow Eucalyptus

Rainbow treetTree nerd: Someone who stops in their tracks to admire a tree.

It could be for its bark, the branching, the age, the canopy. The reasons vary, but the feeling of bliss makes stopping a necessity.

When I stand under the canopy, it is with awe, respect and a fair amount of sheer delight at discovering a new old friend.

I have many photos of a great trees including some world record holders in New Zealand where I lay on my back nestled between roots with camera pointing to the sky and took shots of the canopy. I have other photos including Redwoods in California, Kapoks in Florida, Joshua trees in the desert and dozens of others growing in parks, gardens and backyards.

I seek out champion trees and have fond memories of climbing trees as a child including an amazing beech tree that I later introduced to my child. We climbed it together.

On a walk, bike or drive, I can’t help but notice color, structure, bark, shape and size. A decade ago, I started taking photos of trees that stood out for one reason or another. I added another recently and decided to start a category on this blog to highlight these beauties.

I’m calling it Log: magnificent trees.

Beginning with the Rainbow Eucalyptus  (Eucalyptus deglupta) pictured above.

This is a striking, fragrant tree with extraordinary bark rich with color: reds, oranges, greens, purple, and yellows. In the U.S. it needs a zone 10 location with lots of water and room to grow as it can reach 125 feet.

The bark and breadth of this tree are glorious.

Nature Drama in a Japanese Garden

Screen Shot 2019-01-19 at 7.45.49 AMHere’s the scenario.

This green heron sat very still, half hidden by a stone.  Inch-long fish wiggled very near in the pond but just out of reach of the bird.  The enterprising heron took wee bits of whatever it found on the stone, dropped them into the water and waited.

The found “lure” dropped into the pond rippled the surface. The heron watched. An unsuspecting fish swam to investigate and became lunch.

Did you know green herons use bait to catch fish?

This certainly wasn’t the highlight of Morakami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray, Florida, but it was a fascinating snippet of nature.

The botanical garden grounds are exquisitely manicured and there is a variety of different types of Japanese gardens including six historical gardens.

Much of the lake shoreline reminded me of the Adirondacks with its boulders and rocky ledges. I’m always considering, “What can I take home from this experience?”

In the Adirondacks, the landscape is wild. Here the wilderness was partially tamed through pruning and placement of pathways, wooden bridges, archways and bamboo fencing.

Mostly pruning considering the boulders are enormous and spans of rock ledge extend into the waters where turtles and koi eagerly put on a show.

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One of the many pleasures of the gardens is the carefully positioned benches set into the scene to give visitors a resting place with long views of expanded spaces and unfolding natural dramas.

There’s a lot to see including art exhibits. And, lunch here is a culinary delight. Check out the website: https://morikami.org

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Building Garden Structures with Sticks and Saplings

Screen Shot 2019-01-17 at 9.16.05 AMThis is my idea of fun.

Patrick Doughtery, a carpenter and sculpture, is creating a huge stick sculpture at the Mounts Botanical Garden in Palm Beach County, Florida from truckloads of saplings.

Dougherty, who is based in North Carolina,  has created his Stickwork projects in Scotland, Japan, Brussels and all over the United States, including Cincinnati’s Taft Museum of Art.

I’m looking at this and thinking…Hmm. Can we scale this down and make a sapling sculpture in a community garden? What would you create?

A tunnel for hanging gourds? A playhouse? A secret room?

Has anyone made one? If so, let me know about it please! And send pictures!

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New Opportunity: American Community Gardening Association Board Member

NatalieprtraitshotHi everyone,

I’ve got news.

I was recently elected to the board of directors of the American Community Gardening Association.

Their mission is to build community by increasing and enhancing community gardening and greening across the United States and Canada.

It is my hope to work with others sharing our knowledge to create an ever stronger network of community gardens from coast to coast.  During my cross-country trips, I saw first hand how connecting people and linking our collective know-how helped with important issues such as food security and growing healthy organic produce following sound environmental practices.

There are great folks who are doing wonderful work in community gardens, improving quality of life with opportunities for better nutrition, recreation, exercise, job training, therapy and education.

Launching the Pitney Meadows community gardens was great.  In two short years we brought so many ideas to fruition. The gardens flourished. And while all we accomplished is great, getting to know the community was even greater.

You are a wonderful group and I am proud to have been part of the success from the butterfly garden, grandmother’s garden, the food donated to the pantries, the incredible growth, the adult and children education programs, the fairy festivals, the sunflowers and so much more.

I cherish the friendships created and couldn’t imagine not having you as part of my future. Let’s keep in touch as we continue this good work.

Natalie Walsh

Happy Holidays

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Yesterday, a soft coating of fresh snow covered the farm. Now, we are really tucked in for the winter. The garden looks peaceful and serene.

As the garden rests, this gardener will be working on many writing and art projects, visiting family and catching up.

I will keep you posted. Please do the same. I’d love to hear from you.

See you in the Spring, Natalie

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Time to Tuck in the Garden Beds for the Winter

Tucked in.jpgIt was a chilly, drizzling morning Saturday, but still we got so much done in the gardens.

Thank you all who came out and worked cleaning beds.  We stayed busy and enjoyed the homemade onion soup made from our own onions, fried dough, cookies and turmeric tea.

With the frosty temperatures forecast this week, everyone should be clearing out the last of the warm loving vegetables: basil, tomatoes, peppers, beans, cucumbers, eggplants. Harvest before the freezing temperatures.

Cool season veggies like carrots, lettuce, broccoli, cabbage, kale and Brussels sprouts do well when the weather gets nippy so – if you are a gardener in good standing – you can leave them for now.

Some gardens still need to be tended, but I trust it will be done by Oct. 22.

Our mandatory meeting is Oct. 24th at the Spring Street Gallery at 6 p.m. That is when you will be able to choose your garden beds for next season and hear about our plans for 2019.

See you in the gardens, Natalie

 

 

 

Great turnout at the Pitney Meadows Community Gardens’ Fairy Gathering and Sunflower Measuring

Approximately 800 people visited the Pitney Meadows Community Gardens for the 2nd annual fall fairy gathering and measuring of the sunflowers. Many wore fairy attire and the garden was a flurry of fluttering fairies enjoying field games, live music, dance and an appearance by the fairy queen.Screen Shot 2018-09-23 at 11.50.04 AM.png

 

Look What Kim Did!

 

Kim F. decorated this chair as a throne for the Fairy Queen who will arrive at the Pitney Meadows Community Gardens Fairy Gathering this Saturday at 1 p.m.

The Queen will lead children though the gardens weaving her tale sure to delight. She will be followed by Paula, our fairy dance mother, who will dance a fairy dance with everyone who wants to participate.

Surely the queen will love all the preparations the fairy godmothers have done. There will be flower fairy crowns, wings and wands available for purchase. And children will have many hand crafted houses on display.

Raffles of hand-made fairy houses and a centerpiece, a fairy doll, a fairy garden and fairy inspired art works and a beautiful scarf.

Festivities start at noon and run to three p.m.  There will be field games, more games, a food truck from Nine Miles East,  free Ben and Jerry’s ice cream while supplies last and live music for all to enjoy.

The sunflowers in the sunflower contest will be measured at 2 p.m. and prizes awarded.

Come to the fairy gathering and be enchanted!

Pitney Meadows Community Farm is at 223 West Avenue in Saratoga Springs, NY.