From Caterpillars to Chrysalises

They grow up so fast!

Our three little caterpillars became chrysalises yesterday.

Jess C. reported that they started to spin silk and in a short amount of time attached themselves to the net sides of the butterfly habitat where they will remain until Spring.

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If you look closely you can see the silk the caterpillars use to attach themselves.

They are in safe, competent hands and are another thing to look forward to next season.

Just as our gardens are tucked in for winter, so now are our butterflies.

Thanks, Jess and Charlotte, our butterfly caretakers.

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Look Who’s in the Garden!

Screen Shot 2017-08-29 at 9.34.32 AM I found five black swallowtail caterpillars feasting on parsley in one of the raised beds early this morning.

It’s not surprising that we have black swallowtail butterflies as they are found in open areas and lay eggs singly on the new foliage of host plants, of which parsley is one.

I’m hoping we can find the chrysalis in the next  few weeks and follow it’s development into a butterfly.

Let me know if you see it, won’t you?

 

 

 

Do you Know Whose Web This Is?

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This is the web of a Golden Orb Spider. A masterpiece of a spider with yellow and black markings. It is also known as the writing spider because the center of the web reminded someone of handwriting.

Could this spider be the inspiration behind Charlotte’s Web writer E.B. White’s character Charlotte, who wrote messages in her web for the farmer?

The Pitney Meadows Community Gardens are a great place to imagine and get inspired. Come and see.

 

Tomato Hornworms in the Garden

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This morning, I found tomato hornworms, Manduca quinquemaculata, on a single tomato plant in one of the raised beds.

These are destructive caterpillars that will defoliate a plant very quickly and decimate your tomatoes. They also like to devour peppers, potatoes and eggplants.

Here’s what to look for: black turds, defoliation of the tender top leaves and a green caterpillar that is both fascinating and disgusting at the same same.

Usually there are many turds on a leaf or on the ground. If you see this, start looking for the hornworms, which can be up to four-inches long. They are called hornworms because they have a black “horn” on the last abdominal segment.

Handpick hornworms from infested plants and remove them from the garden.

Hornworms become a moth commonly known as a hummingbird, hawk, or sphinx moth.

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Enter a captionDamage down by Tomato Hornworms

 

 

 

Good News, Not So Bad News, Bad News

The good news is our gardens are looking good.Screen Shot 2017-08-12 at 11.09.55 AM

The not-so-bad news is there is still some septoria leaf spot and powdery mildew, so we need to stay on top of it.

Bad News

Multiple masses of squash bug eggs were found (see image below) on the underside of a patty pan squash leaf but they also will go after winter squash, zucchini, pumpkins, cucumbers and melons. Screen Shot 2017-08-12 at 11.06.21 AM

These need to be removed promptly before the squash bugs hatch.

I take a tissue or paper towel and scrape the eggs off the plants.  Look for clusters of reddish eggs on the undersides of leaves and often close to the ground, but not always. Be thorough. Squash bugs can be a real pest to gardeners. They are aggressive feeders and will cause a plant to blacken and die.

If you find one cluster, examine the entire plant. There are likely to be other clusters.

Thank you, gardeners. By acting quickly, we should be able to control this pest.

 

Chafer Beetles in the Garden

While Jess was weeding in the cosmos bed, she found half–inch long beetles in the sandy soil around the roots of crabgrass and saved some for identification.

They are brown chafers. The grubs cause damage to turf  and while adults will make a few holes in our vegetable leaves they are generally not a problem to our garden plants.

Thanks Jess for your bringing this to our attention. If you find an insect and want it identified, leave it in a jar in the shed and I will do my best to find out what it is and how to deal with it.

I will take an image tomorrow. In the meantime, Google brown chafer beetle for images.