Saratoga Bridges Plants a Bed

Screen Shot 2017-08-10 at 11.48.36 AMSaratoga Bridges, an organization that enables people with disabilities to live enriching lives, came to the Pitney  Meadows Community Gardens this morning and planted seeds for green beans, mache* and Peppermint Swiss chard.

Working with Garden Director Natalie Walsh, each person planted according to the seed packets instructions, patted the planted seeds for good soil contact and watered well. In the weeks to come, different groups from the organization will care for the plants in their raised bed.

*Mache is a dark salad green, rich in Vitamin C, that grows close to the ground in rosette-shaped bunches that have elongated leaves.  It is a favorite salad green in Europe.

 

 

 

Art work by the Young Gardeners

Avery2Sometimes it is just so hot and humid that the young gardeners retreat to the shade of the pine trees adjacent to the Moreau Community Garden.

Sitting in the shade, cooling down and having a drink of water is always an option. Some days, some gardeners feel it is just too hot to be in the sun. For them, paper and crayons are always at hand.  All I ask is that the drawings be of the garden.

In the artwork above, Avery has captured the big tree and the raised beds where we grow carrots, kale, sugar snap peas, green peppers, green beans, yellow beans and purple beans, red Norland potatoes, onions, tomatoes, cabbage, spearmint, peppermint and lots of  herbs including sage, basil, oregano, parsley and thyme.

When I looked at these masterpieces recently, I loved the perspective.  You have all seen my photographs of the garden. Now enjoy the artwork of the youngsters that work in the garden, weeding, watering and growing vegetables.

That’s our scarecrow, Luigi. He watches over the garden.

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It’s a big job as there are many raised beds.Avery

In addition to vegetables, we grow flowers for the pollinators.

Daphneart

This is a picture of a wooden crow that rests in our garden.

Jillianart

And here is a picture of me, Natalie, in my yellow hat.

Thank you young gardeners — or, should I say — young artists for the drawings.

I especially love the drawing Hannah did of me and I appreciate the poem she wrote on the back. Thank you. It is a great pleasure teaching all of you how to grow food.

Natalie

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Hannah'snote

Final Week for the Young Gardeners

sunflowersIt has been a wonderful season with few problems and lots of produce.

Today the gardeners harvested the remaining wax, green and purple beans. They also filled a box with edible nasturtiums — They love to eat the bright colored orange flowers which have a peppery flavor. They also harvested tomatoes, kale, beets, celery, carrots and a few radishes.

I’d call that a productive day…wouldn’t you?

Over the past few weeks the vegetables brought back to the camp were cleaned and prepared by staffers for snacks. Some vegetables got better reviews than others.

The young gardeners told me of all the carrots — the purple, white, yellow and orange — the orange had the best flavor. They ate the carrots with a chive dip. The chives came from our garden.

In addition, some of the beans were steamed before serving though a fair number were eaten raw straight out of the garden.

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The scallions were used in a Mexican dip served with chips. The potatoes were cut up and cooked with onions. The kids also made zucchini muffins.

And the rapini was cut up into a salad and served with ranch dressing. Every last bit was eaten.

The favorite vegetable has to be the sugar snap peas. Everyone enjoys those. Who wouldn’t. They are as sweet as candy when ripened on the vine.

This was a great season. As we were leaving the garden today the young gardeners told me how much they enjoyed learning about the bugs, the plants and what it takes to grow food. Some told me their families have started gardens.

“What’s your favorite thing to do?” I asked.

“Harvesting,” they shouted.

“I liked everything we did. Every week,” one young gardener said. “The lemonades..strawberry, watermelon and basil,” said another.

One young fellow said he loved everything to do with the community garden.

“Even weeding?” I asked.

“Yes, I even like the weeding,” he said, adding “I will see you next year.”

The gardeners initiated a group hug and said “Goodbye.”

That was a great good bye. The garden grew a lot of vegetables, but also a love of growing food together.  And that’s a good life-long skill.

Thank you to all the gardeners and to everyone that made this program possible.

Our Abundant Harvest

Carrot harvesting was fun and a bit of a treasure hunt for the purple, white, yellow and orange carrots hidden beneath the soil.  We counted and compared the different color carrots and found purple were the most robust. The carrots were sent back to the community center where they will be served as snack.

Carrot harvesting was fun and a bit of a treasure hunt for the purple, white, yellow and orange carrots hidden beneath the soil. We counted and compared the different color carrots and found purple were the most robust. The carrots were sent back to the community center where they will be washed and served as snack. For the gardening record: approximately 80 carrots were gathered from one bed.

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We harvested so many beans...hundreds! The young gardeners picked the bed clean of purple, yellow and green beans. A large bag full was sent back with them but the young harvesters also sampled as they went.  What's better than a bean right off the vine!

We harvested so many beans…hundreds! The young gardeners picked the bed clean of purple, yellow and green beans. A large full bag was sent back with them but the young harvesters also sampled as they went. What’s better than a bean right off the plant and warmed by the sun!

The first time we harvested beans, one young gardeners asked what a bean looked like.  Now he knows!

The first time we harvested beans, one young gardener asked what a bean looked like. Now he knows!

We cleared the harvested bean bed back to the soil. But the beans we planted a few weeks ago are doing well.

We cleared the harvested bean bed back to the soil. But the beans we planted a few weeks ago are doing well.

The celery before the young gardeners harvested.

The celery before the young gardeners harvested.

Celery being trimmed of roots before being sent back with the young gardeners for snack.

Celery being trimmed of roots before being sent back with the young gardeners for snack.

The robust harvest was celebrated with strawberry lemonade, which is easy to make. Simply clean and trim a cup of strawberries and add them to a blender with 2 cups of lemonade. Pour this mix through a strainer and into a pitcher of lemonade.

“I don’t like it,” one young gardener said, teasing . . . “I LOVE IT.”

A pleasant way to end a good gardening day.  Happy gardening.

Harvested Bundles of Carrots, Potatoes, Basil and Started Cleaning Up

Harvesting in the garden is in full swing now.

The young gardeners all had a chance to pull carrots from the ground . . . a well loved activity.  Who doesn’t love a fresh from the garden carrot?

We also harvested basil, green peppers, and red potatoes. I can’t wait to hear what Laurie made with these.

GARDEN CLEAN UP

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Cleaning up the garden has begun.  Now that the sugar snap pea vines are turning brown, we can pull them up and throw the vines into the compost bin.  The young gardeners worked at this task and two raised beds were cleared.  This gives better air circulation for the tomatoes in the same bed. Tomatoes need good air flow to keep diseases in check.

It was a fine day in the garden even after one of the gardeners was stung by a yellow jacket. No one knew a hive had made a nest in the drain near the faucet.  If you do get stung in a garden, raw onion on the sting can help.

Stings unfortunately can happen in a garden.  Fortunately, the young gardener was able to shake off the experience after a short while. The recreation department heroes have destroyed the nests – there were two in the grate.

For refreshments, cucumber water was served.  The young gardeners enjoyed the water which is so easy to prepare.  Peel a cucumber, slice it and add the slices to a pitcher of cold water. Let it sit for an hour. That’s it.

The next two weeks will be busy ones in the garden. There is still so much to be harvested!  Come see!

 

 

Before the Rain…

My husband and I arrived early and had our hands in the earth by 8:15.

We could see the sky darkening. Undaunted, we planted carrots, cucumbers, kale, spinach, herbs, flowers and more.

We cleaned up between rows. When you weed your beds, throw the weeds in a bin. Don’t leave them or any debris from your beds in the pathways. Only wood chips should be in the pathways. This will become increasingly important as the season progresses.

By the time we were done the rain was starting so we packed up the tools and left.

Just in time, too. As we drove away we could hear the thunder, see the lightning and within minutes…a deluge of rain poured down.

But we felt good. It is satisfying to have the garden planted and mother nature watering her in.

Smiling….Natalie

Great Day!

MCG1Thanks to a hard working crew and gardeners much was accomplished in the garden yesterday.

Roto-tilling, weeding the beds and between beds, and, of course, catching up with each other after the long winter.

It felt so good to be back.

Many thanks to Harris Seeds for their donation!

Some tips for gardeners –

Dill deters squash bugs, so plant them together

Bed #34 is the communal bed for herbs.

No invasive plants may be planted in the garden beds or surrounding plots.

Thanks, Natalie

Natalie